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Emergency Medicine - Bibliography by Topic

Fink, M. P., Kameneva, M., Macias, C. A., and Tenhunen, J. J. (2014, July 26). Fluid derived from aloe plant prolongs life after hemorrhagic shock in animal study. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Abstract: A novel resuscitation fluid derived from aloe vera that was developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh’s McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine has the potential to save the lives of patients with massive blood loss, according to results of an animal study published in the August edition of the medical journal Shock. The findings could have a significant impact on the treatment of hemorrhagic shock caused by both civilian and military trauma.

Plaskett, L. G. (1997, January). Aloe vera and sports injuries. Aloe Vera Information Services(newsletter). Camelford, Cornwall, UK: Biomedical Information Services Ltd.

Abstract: Aloe vera eases, through its anti-inflammatory and healing effects, a wide variety of sports injuries and troubles, including swelling and pain in joints, soreness of muscles, tendonitis, bursitis, strains, sprains, bruises, including bone bruises, cramps, skin irritation (shoulder-pad irritation and bra burn), fungal infections, turf burns, blisters, itching, and sunburn. In the less-frequent conditions of injury that involve deep trauma and in which surgery may have to be used, Aloe vera also soothes inflammation, eases pain, and promotes repair of the injury.

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (2004, July 27). Fluid derived from Aloe plant prolongs life after hemorrhagic shock in animal study. Science Daily.

Abstract: A novel resuscitation fluid derived from Aloe vera that was dev eloped by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh’s McGowan Institute for Generative Medicine has the potential to save the lives of patients with massive blood loss, according to results of an animal study published in the August edition of the medical journal Schock. The findings could have a significant impact on the treatment of hemorrhagic shock caused by both civilian and military trauma.

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